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Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Increasing incidence of primary reverse and anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty in the United States

Published:August 25, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2020.08.010

      Background

      The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) and anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) in the United States and examine changes in age- and sex-based procedure rates. A secondary goal was to determine the incidence of hemiarthroplasty.

      Methods

      Using nationally representative data along with US Census data, we identified >508,000 cases of primary RTSA, anatomic TSA, and shoulder hemiarthroplasty from 2012 to 2017. Trends in the incidence of each procedure were analyzed, and sex- and age-adjusted procedure rates were calculated.

      Results

      From 2012 to 2017, the population-adjusted incidence of primary RTSA increased from 7.3 cases per 100,000 persons (22,835 procedures) to 19.3 cases per 100,000 (62,705 procedures); anatomic TSA increased from 9.5 cases per 100,000 (29,685 procedures) to 12.5 cases per 100,000 (40,665 procedures); and hemiarthroplasty decreased from 3.7 cases per 100,000 (11,695 procedures) to 1.5 cases per 100,000 (4930 procedures). These trends were observed among male and female patients, as well as all age groups. The greatest increase in incidence was seen in male patients as well as patients aged 50-64 years undergoing RTSA.

      Conclusion

      The incidence of primary RTSA and incidence of anatomic TSA have increased substantially in the United States from 2012 to 2017 whereas the incidence of hemiarthroplasty has decreased.

      Level of evidence

      Keywords

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